Edgar August Stimson obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Edgar August Stimson

July 12, 1941 - April 19, 2017

Obituary


Edgar "Bud" A. Stimson passed away on April 19, surrounded by his loving wife of 32 years, Patti Stimson, and many members of his large family.
Bud was born July 12, 1941 to Edgar Stimson, Sr., and Frances Stimson. He had five siblings: Margie Strauss, Marilee Davis, Marianne Zern, Bill Stimson and Sally Duffy. All of them adored him and leaned on him. One of his sisters said that he was a gentleman, but even more important he was a gentle man.

Bud grew up in the glorious St. Al's neighborhood. As...

Edgar "Bud" A. Stimson passed away on April 19, surrounded by his loving wife of 32 years, Patti Stimson, and many members of his large family.
Bud was born July 12, 1941 to Edgar Stimson, Sr., and Frances Stimson. He had five siblings: Margie Strauss, Marilee Davis, Marianne Zern, Bill Stimson and Sally Duffy. All of them adored him and leaned on him. One of his sisters said that he was a gentleman, but even more important he was a gentle man.

Bud grew up in the glorious St. Al's neighborhood. As a boy he played on a St. Aloysius grade school championship basketball team and was known throughout the city as an undefeated boxer for Knights of Columbus. He loved sports of all kinds. He attended Gonzaga Prep football games throughout his life, played catcher on many softball teams, and fired golf balls off a tee with a power that caused even his opponents to whistle.

Bud graduated from Gonzaga Prep in 1959. Typically, he chose the most challenging course of studies of Latin, Greek and higher math, though he had to work late every night cooking hamburgers and delivering pizza to pay his tuition. He earned his bachelor's degree at Eastern Washington University while working the night shift at Eastern State Hospital to support a young family.

Always strong and steady himself, Bud spent his life thinking about the vulnerable of society (no doubt reflecting the influence of his mother). Immediately after earning his Masters degree in Social Work at the University of Washington, he teamed up with his good friend Bob Goodwin and together they formed a citywide coalition of hospitals, churches local governments, police, and other groups, to create Spokane's first Crisis Clinic.

He became director of social work at Eastern State Hospital in an era when mental hospitals were more about maintaining than curing. Bud so steadfastly enforced reforms that some of his employees would not speak to him. Ultimately the staff presented him with a plaque that read: "For Persistence and Unbelievable Patience Beyond the Call of Duty. From Your Colleagues."

Bud loved children, most of all his own five children, Theresa Demers, Patti Sager, Vicki Shroll, Michael, and Steve, and his three step-children, Leonard, Belinda and Charles Bail. He delighted in the company of his nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

One Christmas Bud sanded, shellacked and hand-lettered plaques with the words of Max Ehrmann's poem Desiderata. He distributed them to family members as a message he wanted to pass along. The poem begins:

Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons.

That was Bud.

There will be a memorial Mass at St. Aloysius Church, June 17, at 10 a.m. It will be followed by a reception in O'Malley Hall in the basement of the church.



Arrangements under the direction of Sunland Memorial Park, Mortuary & Cremation Center, Sun City, AZ.